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Goshen County, Wyoming


TORRINGTON

Torrington was given its name by an early settler, William G. Curtis, after his hometown of Torrington, Conn. Today, Torrington is a thriving community where you can enjoy a number of recreational activities.

 The Town of Torrington is the center of the region’s commercial activity.  Within this agricultural community there are several fertilizer plants, a sugar factory, tourist facilities and retail businesses serving the local and rural populations.

 When entering from the south, watch for the Torrington Depot, now a National Historic Place and home of the Homesteaders Museum.  The building is a fine example of Union Pacific depot construction in the early 20th century.  Here visitors have the opportunity to take an intimate look at the development of eastern Wyoming as a primary agricultural area along the famous Oregon and Mormon Trails.

 Between Torrington and Guernsey, travelers will follow the historic Oregon and Mormon Trails as they make their way along the North Platte River.


 
LINGLE

Lingle located at the junction of U.S. 85 and 26 is within two miles of the Grattan Massacre Site (1854).  This site marks one of the earliest conflicts between the U.S. Soldiers and Native Americans.  Lingle is also the home of the Western History Center located on its Main Street.  The WHC is an educational and research facility displaying artifacts from prehistoric sites through photos, fossils, lithic and faunal materials, exhibits, tours and discussions with Center personnel.



                                                   
FORT LARAMIE

Fort Laramie, the first garrisoned post in Wyoming, is located adjacent to the town of Fort Laramie, 23 miles west of Torrington at the confluence of the North Platte and the Laramie Rivers.  It was the most important outpost on the major emigrant trails, the Oregon, Mormon and Pony Express.

 Fort Laramie had its beginning in June 1834 when fourteen Rocky Mountain Fur Company men built a small stockade post.  During its heyday the Fort became a haven for gold seekers and wary emigrants, a station fro the Pony Express and the Overland Stage, and served as an important military post in conquest of the Plains Indians.  There are 22 original structures, many of which have been restored and are available for the visitor’s enjoyment.  Also located on the grounds are a visitor’s center and bookstore.


 
JAY EM

Jay Em named from the Texas Trail driver James Moore, is located along Rawhide Creek in northern Goshen County.  In the early and mid 1900’s Jay Em was a vital economic community.  Today, the small community is designated a National Historic District.  Tours are given by appointment during the summer.


 
YODER

The town of Yoder is just west of U.S. 85 on the road to Cheyenne.  The town is only a few miles from Springer Reservoir where you can enjoy fishing, boating, water skiing or a leisurely afternoon taking photographs.


 
LAGRANGE

The town of LaGrange, the oldest incorporated town in Goshen County (1889) is a farming and ranching community.  The park with picnic area, tennis courts, and rodeo grounds entices visitors to stop and enjoy the small community’s hospitality.


 
VETERAN

Veterans of WWI founded this small community.  The community is centrally located for water recreation.


 
HAWK SPRINGS

This community was named for a gentleman named “Hawk” who lived next to the local springs and operated a stagecoach station in early 1900’s.  Hawk Springs’ recreation area is five miles southeast of the community, nestled between 66 Mountain and Bear Mountain.  Here one can enjoy boating, water skiing, fishing, and plenty of photo opportunities.

 


Wyoming

“Equal Rights”

 Capital. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cheyenne

Nickname. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Big Wyoming, Equality State, Cowboy State

Motto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Equal Rights”

Admitted to Union. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .July 10, 1890 – 44th State

Size. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97,914 square miles, 9th largest State

Highest Point. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gannett Peak, 13,804 feet

Lowest Point. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,100 feet Belle Fourche River

Average Annual Precipitation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.5 inches

Population (2000 Census). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .493,782

 

 

State Flower – Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja linariaefolia)

Adopted: January 31, 1917

State Mammal – Bison (Bison bison)

Adopted: February 23, 1985

State Bird Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta)

Adopted: February 5, 1927

State Tree Plains Cottonwood (Populus sargentii)

Adopted: February 1, 1947 – Amended : 1961

State Gemstone Jade (Nephrite)

Adopted: January 25, 1967

State Fish Cutthroat Trout (salmo clarki)

Adopted: February 18, 1987

State Reptile Horned Toad (Douglassi brevirostre)

Adopted: February 18, 1993

State Fossil Knightia)

Adopted: February 18, 1987

State Dinosaur Triceratops

Adopted: March 18, 1994

 

Goshen County Demographic Profile